WORKS EXHIBITIONS ABOUT

 

In convo with David Horvitz about “Nostalgia 500”


Here we are in conversation with long time friend David Horvitz on “Nostalgia 500”, the piece he created for “Time Out of Joint”, the exhibition we curated for the Yerevan Biennial taking place on the Darknet.

 

 

 

 

We curated a project for the Yerevan Biennial!


Very excited to announce we curated a special project for the Yerevan Biennial!

“Time Out of Joint” is an online exhibition entirely taking place on the Darknet, a remote location at the “periphery” of the Internet, where time operates at a slow pace and pages load unhurriedly.
New works by six artists including Joshua Citarella, Clusterduck, David Horvitz, Vladan Joler, Amalia Ulman and 2050+ will be added once every two weeks, from October 2020 to January 2021, and in peer-to-peer style they are available to be seen, copied, reused… The title for this show was borrowed from a novel by Philip K. Dick.

To see the exhibition download the Tor Browser at www.torproject.org

and go to -> http://fjroxjgxhmd2ymp2.onion

Trailer credits:
Soundtrack by Aghnie https://soundcloud.com/aghnie
Smuggling Type Design by RHIZOMAT ZARBIS
Concept, Production and Editing by Clusterduck
GIFs by https://www.animatedimages.org

 

 

 

 

Ongoing and unseen…


Eva & Franco Mattes, What Has Been Seen

Art in the Age of Anxiety” at the Sharjah Art Foundation, curated by Omar Kholeif.

With Lawrence Abu Hamdan, Cory Arcangel, Jeremy Bailey, Wafaa Bilal, James Bridle, Antoine Catala, Douglas Coupland, Thomson & Craighead, Simon Denny, Aleksandra Domanović, Constant Duulart, Electronic Disturbance Theatre, Cao Fei, Oliver Laric, Lynn Hershman Leeson, Rafael Lozano-Hemmer, Eva & Franco Mattes, Joshua Nathanson, Katja Novitskova, Trevor Paglen, Jon Rafman, Tabor Robak, Pamela Rosenkranz, Aura Satz, Bogosi Sekhukhuni, Jenna Sutela, UVA, Siebren Versteeg, Andrew Norman Wilson, Guan Xiao, YOUNG-HAE CHANG HEAVY INDUSTRIES.

 

 

 

 

Ceiling Cat in the public domain


Eva & Franco Mattes

We just released to public domain the hires image of our sculpture Ceiling Cat, through Wikipedia. We made an agreement with SFMOMA – who acquired the work – to give up ownership of the photo, so that anybody can copy it and use it for whatever purpose, free of charge: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Eva_and_Franco_Mattes,_Ceiling_Cat.jpg
You’re all welcome to download it and use it!

 

 

 

 

SELL YOUR PHONE (AND ALL OF YOUR PHOTOS) FOR $1,000


Eva and Franco Mattes, Riccardo Uncut

We are looking for a person who is willing to sell their phone, including all stored photos and videos. The photo and video contents will be used for an artwork addressing issues of privacy, exhibitionism and voyeurism in our hyperconnected society.

The work will preview in our solo exhibition at Fotomuseum Winterthur and become part of the museum’s permanent collection. In other words: your photos will become public, forever.

To apply -> https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1cW9fJ6u-yHNZ1jf_opDKIeLBrEtvW4lvLkUpWkGAJnU/edit

Looking forward to seeing too much of you!

 

 

 

 

No Fun on Artforum


Eva & Franco Mattes, No Fun

 

“We’re becoming uncomfortably intimate with loss, and even death, through our screens – but this time, it’s real.” Timely piece by Tina Rivers Ryan on today’s Artforum.

 

 

 

 

Vid of “What Has Been Seen” at Fondation Phi


Today is the last day of our solo at Fondation Phi pour l’art contemporain, in Montreal. To fight sadness here’s a video in which curator Erandy Vergara (shout-out!) talks about the show.

 

 

 

 

Pics of “What Has Been Seen” at Fondation Phi


Eva & Franco Mattes, BEFNOED

Just posted the documentation of our solo at the Fondation Phi pour l’art contemporain, in Montreal, curated by Erandy Vergara. It’s our largest show ever, with works made in the last 10 years. The title refers to the “What Has Been Seen Cannot Be Unseen” meme, an internet axiom which states that repulsive, disturbing, or horrific sights can never be erased from memory once they have been seen…

In the 90s we were obsessed with visibility, traffic logs, reaching an ever larger audience, but with the passing of time, and the advent of internet 2.0, we became more and more interested in the opposite: invisibility and disappearance, erasing data, staying anonymous, ‘unseeing’, microwaving hard-drives…

Up till March 15, 2020!

Pics by Melania Dalle Grave for DSL Studio

 

 

 

 

“Personal Photographs October 2016” at Careof, Milan


Eva and Franco Mattes, Personal Photographs

Eva and Franco Mattes, Personal Photographs

Eva and Franco Mattes, Personal Photographs

“Personal Photographs October 2016” (2019) is a network of cable trays around and throughout the exhibition site of Careof, Milan, part of our ongoing show “My Little Big Data”. All the photos we shot in October 2016 – 145 files – are in constant circulation within the cables. Images without viewers, yet always there. Like most images nowadays. These cable trays, extending for 50 meters and holding 500 meters of cables, represent an infrastructure disposed toward invisibility, made conspicuously present within this former industrial site. In navigating real space and contending with pre-existing structures, they mirror the assimilation of the internet’s operations into everyday life.

Pics by Delfino Sisto Legnani and Melania Dalle Grave.

 

 

 

 

“My Little Big Data” video essay


Eva & Franco Mattes, My Little Big Data

Eva & Franco Mattes, My Little Big Data

Eva & Franco Mattes, My Little Big Data

“My Little Big Data” is a video essay, part of our ongoing show at Careof, Milan. This 24 mins video is the result of a year long collaboration with data investigator Vladan Joler, to whom we gave 13 years of our private email matadata and several months of browsing history. Like most people, we use the Internet in nearly every aspect or our lives, so to see these data is to experience what Internet Service Providers, government agencies, internet giants and data dealers are seeing. This is the point of view from the Panopticon tower, where a centralized hub of information maintains records of our every move. Like the famous portal in Spike Jonze’s movie led to John Malkovich’s head, this video is a portal into our minds.

Pics by Delfino Sisto Legnani and Melania Dalle Grave.