WORKS SHOWS ABOUT

 

On Las Meninas


velazquez las meninas

I’ve always been fascinated by Velázquez’s Las Meninas, but never quite understood why. Reading this piece by art critic Blake Gopnik made everything clearer and more confused at the same time:

In this painting, every time we think we’re smart enough to know what’s going on, Velazquez tells us he’s smarter still.

 

 

 

 

New sculpture by Cattelan turns out to be an Art prank


work catt sculpture

We wanted to make a work about Internet’s overflowing creativity vs. high art fixation with originality. We found a cat meme collage circulating online, and we ended up making this fake sculpture by art-star Maurizio Cattelan with it. It’s a small yellow taxidermy bird perched atop a birdcage that imprisons an angry-looking taxidermy cat.

The piece has been exhibited at Inman Gallery Annex, in Houston, TX, for a month now as a work by Cattelan, and will be there through January 15, 2011. We thought, let’s wear the mask of a famous artist and see what happens: Will people realize it immediately? Will they say ‘this is his worst work ever?’ Or will they love it?

The reception by the art world has been enthusiastic so far. Who knows what’s going to happen when they find out it’s a prank.

You can see some photos here

and read the press release here

 

 

 

 

My Generation video now online


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My Generation is a video collage of kids freaking out while playing videogames. It runs on an old broken computer (that still works).

You can see the video here

 

 

 

 

Freedom


Eva and Franco Mattes, Freedom

Freedom (2010) is a performance we did in the game Counter-Strike, where Eva tries to convince the other players to save her because she is trying to make an artwork. The result is her being endlessly killed and abused.

You can watch the video here (turn HD on to read the chat).

 

 

 

 

Interview about Plan C on The Creators Project


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A lot of people have been asking us questions about Plan C and our trip to Chernobyl in general. Here’s an interview we just did for The Creators Project, maybe it answers some questions.

“Plan C started with Eva getting drunk in a bar in Barcelona with Ryan C. Doyle, a 6’6” tall and 248-pound tattoo-covered machine artist. In the morning they had decided we needed to go to the Zone. It may have had something to do with our common obsession for Tarkovsky’s Stalker, who knows.”

Read the interview here

 

 

 

 

Radioactive Ride in the Heart of Manchester


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Radioactive Ride in the Heart of ManchesterA group of artists scavenged it from Chernobyl

A project by Ryan C. Doyle, Eva and Franco Mattes aka 0100101110101101.ORG and others

Video and photos PlanC.cc

Manchester UK – A rusty, soviet-style sculpture, created with contaminated materials scavenged from the site of the 1986 Chernobyl disaster, appeared overnight in one of Manchester’s public parks.

The elaborated project is a collaboration of machine artist Ryan C. Doyle and provocateurs Eva and Franco Mattes aka 0100101110101101.ORG, with filmmaker Todd Chandler, gonzo photographer Tod Seelie, DIY organizer Jeff Stark and fabricator Steve Valdez.

In the Summer 2010 the group embarked on a journey to Chernobyl, to develop a secretive Plan C. They had one thing in common: an obsession for Tarkovsky’s 1979 movie Stalker.

After obtaining permissions to enter the highly radioactive Zone of Alienation they ventured into the ghost town of Pripyat and found the abandoned amusement park. Built for May Day 1986 as a gift to the power plant workers it was never inaugurated, since the reactor exploded five days before. Finally the group located what they were hoping to find, the Red Ride. They picked through the irradiated remains.

While they were there a load of scavenged materials left the Zone on a rural tractor, leading west.

A month later the scrap metal was sitting in an anonymous warehouse under the railroad in Manchester, UK, where the group started secretly working day and night on The Liquidator. The sinister-looking sculpture-ride was installed overnight in Manchester’s Whitworth Park.

«The idea came after meeting sculptor James Acord, the only individual licensed to work with radioactive materials» said Eva Mattes «He thinks that it’s inevitable that artists use the materials of their age. I was ten when Chernobyl’s radioactive cloud flew over my head, and into my thyroid».

«Manchester was not a coincidence» declared artist Ryan C. Doyle «it was the heart of the industrial revolution and it’s close to the first and biggest European nuclear power plant».

Concern spread among Manchester citizens: «They say it’s a sculpture but I don’t like it, I don’t see any beauty», said Rosie Parker, a regular of the Park «It seemed very unsafe in the first place, and this radioactive thing makes me shudder».

The ride operated daily for a whole week at the beginning of October, involving thousands of enthusiastic visitors of all ages and origins. It than disappeared as fast as it had appeared.

«Thousands of tons of radioactive scrap metal leave the Zone everyday to be sold to the Russian and Chinese market and eventually come back to us in the form of spoons, pots and sinks», declared Franco Mattes «Radioactivity has no border. So we must probably just get used to it, starting from the younger generations».

The whole project is shredded in mystery and where the sculpture will go next is still unknown. A short film about the whole affair, directed by Todd Chandler and Jeff Stark, is in the making. Plan C is their first collaboration, although they are not new to such adventures. Cumulatively, the group has created jet-powered carnival rides, navigated junk rafts across the Adriatic Sea and organized viral media art campaigns.

More info on the group:
Ryan C. Doyle: happybunnypony.com
Eva and Franco Mattes: 0100101110101101.ORG
Todd Chandler: floodtidefilm.com
Tod Seelie: todseelie.com
Jeff Stark: jeffstark.org
Steve Valdez.

Plan C was commissioned by AND Festival and dispari&dispari project

 

 

 

 

Plan C: The Ride


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In the Summer 2010 a group of six artists went to Chernobyl to develop “Plan C”. While they were there they picked through the irradiated remains.

Before they departed, a rural tractor left the Zone, leading west.

A month later a load of scrap metal was sitting in an anonymous warehouse under the railroad in Manchester, UK.

The group moved into the warehouse and started secretly working day and night on The Liquidator.

After two weeks The Liquidator is ready. The strange interactive sculpture was installed last night in Manchester’s Whitworth Park and is now fully operational.

Plan C’s artists deny The Liquidator is radioactive.

The ride will be operating until the 7th of October.

Vieo and photos can be seen here: PlanC.cc

 

 

 

 

Plan C: The Park


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In the Summer 2010 a group of six artists embarked on a journey to Chernobyl to develop a secretive Plan C.

Once in the Zone, they threw metal nuts. Maybe in search of an answer, they ventured into the abandoned amusement park of the ghost town of Pripyat.

Finally the group located what they were hoping to find, the Red Ride. They picked through the irradiated remains. One of them got contaminated.

While they were there a load of scavenged materials left the Zone.

Where the materials went afterwards is still unknown.

Video: PlanC.cc

 

 

 

 

Plan C: The Zone


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In the Summer 2010 a group of six artists who barely knew each other embarked on a journey to Chernobyl, to develop a secretive Plan C. The story is not clear at all, and it will probably never be.

They came from different parts of Europe and the US, and they had an appointment. Nobody knew about their final destination, nobody knew about Plan C. They told friends vague stories about “entering The Zone” and “throwing metal nuts”. They had one thing in common: an obsession for Tarkovsky’s 1979 movie Stalker.

What happened after is still a secret.

Follow PlanC.cc, it will be as close as you’ll ever get to the truth behind Plan C.

 

 

 

 

“Stolen Pieces” in the Washington Post


stolenpieces exhib postmasters 1

Everybody knows we stole a lot of ideas, but few know we stole more than that. The exhibition we opened last Saturday features “Stolen Pieces”, a project we did in 1995-97 but never showed before. Art critic Blake Gopnik just wrote an in depth article in the Washington Post with his take on the whole story: Couple stole more than other artists’ ideas